Category Archives: Vegan & Vegetarian

Purslane Fatayer

Greetings readers!

After being away for a while, I missed the  blog, I hope you missed it too. I don’t know if I can call my long time away a vacation, but I was not cooking anything spectacular or worth sharing. I was just going quick and convenient. I guess no matter how much you love cooking, when you have to do it every single day, it loses a bit of its luster. But with my return, I have a delicious recipe to share with you.

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Loubieh B Zeit: Lebanese Green Beans with Tomatoes and Olive Oil

Green beans are made two ways in Lebanon. One is a stew with meat and served with rice, the other version is the vegetarian one that is usually consumed in summer or during Lent. It is mainly eaten cold with vegetables like cucumber or onions (any kind you can think of) on the side. I personally like it hot too, rolled in a Lebanese bread or served as a warm salad.

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Taro and Potatoes with Garlic, Lemon and Sumac

Taro is one of my favorite root vegetables. In Lebanon, there are many regional variations to cook it, for instance there is a recipe for taro and chickpeas stew that was a staple in my dad’s side of the family, but my mom’s side of the family knew nothing about. They lived about an hour apart and belong geographically to the same region!

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Carob Molasses Sfouf: An Eggless Lebanese Cake

Sfouf is a yellow cake by the addition of turmeric. It is commonly made during lent, as a dessert. It also is one of the easiest desserts to make all through the year.

Carob Molasses Sfouf is the version that omits turmeric and replaces the sugar with, wait for it because it is going to be such a big surprise, carob molasses!

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The Lebanese Take on Pizza: Mixed Man’oucheh

It is amazing how the Mediterranean cuisine can be similar in many countries but never be the same.

If the Italians can claim the pizza, the Lebanese can claim a similar concoction: the Man’oucheh. Typically eaten for breakfast, but if made in mini it can be used as an appetizer or as party finger food.

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Lentils and Chard in Lemon Soup – Aadas bi Hamoud

This soup is one of my favorites. It is fully made of vegetables, but the presence of the lentils makes it very hearty and the zing from the lemons makes it fresh.

The only risk is you might eat too much of it.

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Potluck Fatayer

I cannot believe how the weather turned from cold to nice in less than a week. I have been waiting for it for a while now; winter lingered and lingered to the point where I thought it was never going to end.

Fatayer are a Lebanese doughy goodie, perfect for anything. Well, almost anything. They can be great party appetizers, great for lunch and they make an awesome breakfast. In Lebanon they can be sold in the Mana’eesh bakeries in a big size for breakfast or lunch. They are great as holiday food or parties when made at their smallest. As far as the medium size they can be a good variety in any occasion. This is why we chose to make them for Clint’s latest potluck.

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Yay! I Finally Nailed Spring Rolls Making

Attempting spring rolls again has been on my mind for the last few days. Although it was not possible for me to make for dinner since I usually get hungry after coming back from my walk and spring rolls need to be eaten right away.

Also after walking, as a rule, I crave some sort of protein. I know it is not the toughest exercise out there but my body has its word to say and I often listen. It always worked for me that way.

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Getting Back on Track: Stuffed Baked Portobello Mushrooms and Cannelloni with Broccoli and Breadcrumbs

It has been a long while since I felt the urge to cook something more intricate than a season salad: I have to admit though that I have been entangled in personal business.

My TB Clint and I got engaged and we were busy with preparations that an engagement entails. We also were preparing for his recent visit in June and my move with him to USA. But some events prevented my move and it had to be postponed.

So now life is back to its normal routine and I think I am back to my Sunday lunch preparation.

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Challenge 12: Chicken Tikka Masala

Hello fans and fellow Taste Buds! I have really been anticipating my attempt at making this dish since the birth of our blog. My first time trying this spicy treat was actually just a few years ago at an Indian restaurant called the Punjabi Dhaba in a small town near my home. The chicken tikka masala I had there was so impressionable on me that immediately upon trying it I had made up my mind that it was among my all time favorite dishes! I hope some of you will have an equally enjoyable experience with this.

The origin of chicken tikka masala is disputed with some believing it came from the Punjab region of India, while others claim it was the creation of a chef in an Indian restaurant in Glasgow, Scotland several decades years ago. Its similarity to butter chicken gives rise to some of the ambiguity of its beginnings. Tikka literally means “small chunks” and masala is a “mixture of spices.” The chicken goes well with this curry masala, but I have had it with lamb tikka as well with similarly delectable results. I have also heard of other versions made with tofu and paneer (an Indian cheese), but I have not had a chance to try those for myself.

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