Tag Archives: Lebanese

Blog Anniversary and Kibbeh B Laban (Kibbeh Meatballs in Yogurt)

Four years ago, the same day the Taste-Buds started. I cannot believe it has been so long already! Although the blog has changed from its original format and my Taste-Buds moved on from blogging, I still consider it as this common venture that gave us a lot of fun and taught us new things. It even helped me get over my baking aversion, I can make some very decent cookies and brownies now, I even made a custard from scratch (supervised by Clint), but I did all the steps myself! A big breakthrough for me!

Continue reading

Purslane Fatayer

Greetings readers!

After being away for a while, I missed the  blog, I hope you missed it too. I don’t know if I can call my long time away a vacation, but I was not cooking anything spectacular or worth sharing. I was just going quick and convenient. I guess no matter how much you love cooking, when you have to do it every single day, it loses a bit of its luster. But with my return, I have a delicious recipe to share with you.

Continue reading

Taro and Potatoes with Garlic, Lemon and Sumac

Taro is one of my favorite root vegetables. In Lebanon, there are many regional variations to cook it, for instance there is a recipe for taro and chickpeas stew that was a staple in my dad’s side of the family, but my mom’s side of the family knew nothing about. They lived about an hour apart and belong geographically to the same region!

Continue reading

Dawood Basha: Lebanese Meatballs in Tomato and Onion Sauce

Dawood Basha

Lebanon has been ruled by the Ottomans for 400 years, same as many surrounding countries. While countries were considered Turkish provinces, Lebanon (known as Mount-Lebanon then) enjoyed a semi-autonomous condition, till fights erupted and the nation was placed under a new system called Mutassarifiyah.  Then Turkish rulers were assigned to Lebanon to stabilize it, in a declining Ottoman Empire. The ruler had the nobility title of Pasha, and was called Mutassarref which literally means executor. Daoud Pasha was the first assigned to the job and rumor has it that this dish was a favorite of his and was called after him. I don’t know how true that last part is, but the preceding mini History lesson is.

Continue reading

Mini Meat Pies: Sfiha

Clint had one of his potlucks at work again, this time it was to say goodbye to a colleague who was moving to another department.

Continue reading

Carob Molasses Sfouf: An Eggless Lebanese Cake

Sfouf is a yellow cake by the addition of turmeric. It is commonly made during lent, as a dessert. It also is one of the easiest desserts to make all through the year.

Carob Molasses Sfouf is the version that omits turmeric and replaces the sugar with, wait for it because it is going to be such a big surprise, carob molasses!

Continue reading

The Lebanese Take on Pizza: Mixed Man’oucheh

It is amazing how the Mediterranean cuisine can be similar in many countries but never be the same.

If the Italians can claim the pizza, the Lebanese can claim a similar concoction: the Man’oucheh. Typically eaten for breakfast, but if made in mini it can be used as an appetizer or as party finger food.

Continue reading

Walnut Katayef from Scratch

Katayef Plate

Katayef and boiled wheat are the staples of St Barbara Day in Lebanon. I have written a post about the tradition already, but this time the difference is I am not in Lebanon anymore and I am trying to share this staple with Clint and the kids.

So I did my research and found a recipe for Katayef from scratch (as you can imagine they are not readily found in pastry shops in California as they would be found in Lebanon). I made them a day later than the actual St Barbara which falls on December 4th, but hey it is the thought that counts!

Continue reading

Homemade Lebanese Shawerma

For those who have seen Shawerma sold in a restaurant or even a little joint  have probably seen the impressive way it is cooked. You can hardly reproduce the same thing at your home, but you can get a nice taste from the version you make yourself.

Continue reading

Lebanese Stuffed Zucchini (Mexican Squash) – Koussa Mehchi

To my surprise, what we call zucchini in Lebanon is called Mexican squash in the USA. The even most surprising part was to see how much veggies eating habits Lebanon shares with Mexico. Tomatoes is an obvious thing, but the most amazing for me was the chickpeas in their pods. It is a snack we eat in Lebanon and it is getting rarer now. It is one of my favorite things to munch on in between meals and you can imagine what a nice surprise it was to see them here.

It is funny how often I see something and tell Clint we eat that in Lebanon and he tells me that it is a food imported by the Mexican community or eaten by them. So you can imagine how funny it was to see that the type of zucchini we eat is called Mexican squash.

Continue reading