Tag Archives: Seafood

Halibut with Mango Salsa

I have been feeling the cooking bug this week for some reason. I made a few unique dishes over the course of the week that might have been nice to post, but I have been too crunched for time to snap photos and make a blog entry. Today was a little different. I went to my parents’ house with the kids and realized they were both going to be working for the next several hours. This was the perfect opportunity to prepare dinner for them and to give my cooking fiend mom a night off.

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Seafood Jambalaya for Easter Lunch

I decided to cook Jambalaya for Easter lunch and to make it with fish and shrimp base. We have invited my uncle and his family for lunch, so I had to double the recipe.

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Wild Rice Jambalaya with Turkey Kielbasa

I had the opportunity to make dinner for the family today, so I decided to go ahead and do the challenge recipe. I wanted to make a healthier version of the jambalaya, so I decided to use shrimp, chicken breast, and turkey polska kielbasa sausage as meats in this dish. I noticed that the turkey sausage only had about 1/3 of the fat of any of the other sausages available and so it seemed the likely candidate. I also decided to use a mix of whole brown and wild rices as the base for the more health-conscious alternative to the white rice.

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Challenge 9: Creole Jambalaya

Jambalaya has been a favorite dish of mine for years. I enjoy the spiciness the dish delivers in addition to the multiplicity of meats. It was created in Louisiana by Spanish settlers attempting to mimic paella with the new and available ingredients in their new location. The Creole versions and the Cajun versions are similar, the major difference being that the Creole version includes tomatoes.

Jambalaya offers flexibility in its preparation as one can use any combination of meats/seafood they desire and it can be served in combination with either rice or pasta. For a basic recipe, I have included one of Emeril Lagasse’s (which I believe is incorrectly dubbed “Cajun Jambalaya”). This recipe looks similar to the ones I enjoy and should give us a good foundation on which to build. I hope you will find a satisfied palate with this challenge.  Bon Appétit !

Recipe: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/emeril-lagasse/cajun-jambalaya-recipe2/index.html

Cajun Jambalaya


  • 12 medium shrimp, peeled, deveined and chopped
  • 4 ounces chicken, diced
  • 1 tablespoon Creole seasoning, recipe follows
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/4 cup chopped onion
  • 1/4 cup chopped green bell pepper
  • 1/4 cup chopped celery
  • 2 tablespoons chopped garlic
  • 1/2 cup chopped tomatoes
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 teaspoon hot sauce
  • 3/4 cup rice
  • 3 cups chicken stock
  • 5 ounces Andouille sausage, sliced
  • Salt and pepper

 Emeril’s ESSENCE Creole Seasoning (also referred to as Bayou Blast):

  •  2 1/2 tablespoons paprika
  • 2 tablespoons salt
  • 2 tablespoons garlic powder
  • 1 tablespoon black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon onion powder
  • 1 tablespoon cayenne pepper
  • 1 tablespoon dried oregano
  • 1 tablespoon dried thyme

In a bowl combine shrimp, chicken and Creole seasoning, and work in seasoning well. In a large saucepan heat oil over high heat with onion, pepper and celery, 3 minutes. Add garlic, tomatoes, bay leaves, Worcestershire and hot sauces. Stir in rice and slowly add broth. Reduce heat to medium and cook until rice absorbs liquid and becomes tender, stirring occasionally, about 15 minutes. When rice is just tender add shrimp and chicken mixture and sausage. Cook until meat is done, about 10 minutes more. Season to taste with salt, pepper and Creole seasoning.

Emeril’s ESSENCE Creole Seasoning

Combine all ingredients thoroughly.
Yield: 2/3 cup

Non Holiday Feasting: Baby Octopi with Red Wine and Rosemary and Potato Gnocchi with Tomato Sauce

Among my co-authors I am the only one who did not have a holiday to celebrate, but that does not mean it is an excuse not to feast. Well I did not exactly feast since the two recipes I am including have been made on different days. The common thing between them is that they are both first timers for me.

The first is baby octopi, the second is gnocchi. I have tried both before in restaurants or at friends, but I never made them myself.

The experience with gnocchi varied from the Italian perfection at Piazza Navona in Rome, with two streets dancers performing a tango on a dolent melody, to the extreme flop in a supposedly good local restaurant, where it seemed reprehensive to laugh.

The octopi experience has always been pleasant to me so I had no bad memories to compensate, so I was able to experiment.

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